The Legal Checkup Blog

Sending Your Child Off To College? Take Note!

Posted by Judith Flynn on Fri, Aug 15, 2014 @ 08:08 AM

As the summer winds down, parents and their teens are crowding stores like Walmart and Bed, Bath & Beyond for comforters, scatter rugs, microwaves, and other items to make the cramped living quarters of a dorm room feel like home.  Students feel excitement and anticipation for the new chapter that is about to unfold, with more independence and autonomy over their day to day lives.  For parents, move-in day typically brings mixed emotions.  It is the day we hoped for and the day we dread all at once.  Many parents think back to their own college experiences and the realization that it is not all about the books, and can only hope that their children exercise good judgment and make smart decisions. 

Parents know that many things can go wrong, and while we hope there are no serious issues, we need to send our children off to college prepared.  Independence sounds great until a student realizes his or her bank account is negative or, worse, ends up in an emergeny room. 

Make sure your child is truly prepared for college.  If your child is 18 or older, he or she should execute a Health Care Proxy (appointing a surrogate decision maker) with a HIPAA Release (release under health privacy law that allows medical providers to speak with you or another designated person in an emergency) and a Durable Power of Attorney to provide you or someone else with the authority to deal with their college or other entities for financial and contractual issues.  (Believe it or not, while the tuition bill is sent to your attention, the school staff will not even speak to you about the account without express authorization from your child.)

These documents are not expensive and do not require a lengthy appointment.  It would be far more expensive and inconvenient to respond to a child's emergency without these important documents in place.  They can typically be drafted after a brief phone consultation, and will be reviewed for accuracy when the child comes in to sign them. 

For more information, call us today at 781-681-6638.

 

Tags: Durable Power of Attorney, Health Care Proxy, disability planning, family, parents, Estate Planning

Wrongful Intent to Discharge Is Elder Abuse

Posted by Judith Flynn on Mon, Jun 09, 2014 @ 10:06 AM

I just received confirmation from a new client that the nursing home has rescinded its notice of Intent to Discharge her grandmother.  While this is great news, and our advocacy has paid off, this case represents a disturbing trend.

 

This is the third case in the past six months in which I was hired to advocate against a wrongful notice of Intent to Discharge an elderly resident of a nursing home on the basis of non-payment.  In all three cases, MassHealth coverage was in place, but there was an outstanding balance ranging from $6,500 - $13,000, for a period prior to the MassHealth approval.  In all three cases, the amount owed represented the Patient Paid Amount (PPA) for a period prior to the time when the client received a notice from MassHealth informing them of their duty to pay a set amount each month.

 

Most people are aware that there is a duty to pay something each month under the Medicaid regulations based on their income less any allowed deductions (the PPA).  Clients are certainly advised of this when working with an elder law attorney and most nursing homes will inform clients of this duty when they are assisting with the application.  (As a side note, I advise against using the nursing home or a non-attorney service that they may refer you to, but that is a separate topic.)  There are instances when the client is not informed in advance, however, through no fault of their own. 

 

By the time the client receives a notice informing them that MassHealth benefits have been approved, and detailing the amount that must be paid each month RETROACTIVELY to the date of eligibility (which could be as much as four months prior to the date of application), the funds may not be there to pay the outstanding PPA.  If a client is not informed that they must hold the funds or pay an estimated PPA each month while the application is pending, they may not have the funds available by the time they receive the notice from MassHealth.

 

In all three of these cases, the balance was owed not because funds were gifted and not due to misappropriation of funds.  The clients were simply not informed that they would need to pay a PPA back to the date of requested eligibility.  The nursing home assisted with the application in one case, and referred the clients to a Medicaid service in both other cases.  Nobody told the client to pay an estimated PPA while the application was pending or to hold the monthly income pending the approval from MassHealth.

 

In the most recent case, when MassHealth ultimately issued an approval notice and indicated the resident's duty to pay a PPA each month going back a couple of months, the nursing home continued to bill for the outstanding balance.  They sent a threatening letter to the resident's granddaughter, who managed the resident's checking account.  She tried to explain the situation to the nursing home administrator, and showed the bank records documenting where the funds went - they were not gifted - they were used to purchase items her grandmother needed.

 

When the granddaughter explained that she had four children and worked full time and barely made ends meet, and simply did not have the funds to pay the nursing home the outstanding amount, the nursing home issued a Notice of Intent to Discharge the resident for non-payment.  My client's grandmother is still mentally competent, so the law required that the nursing home staff serve the notice on her directly.  Imagine the fright my client's 88 year old grandmother experienced when she was handed a notice informing her she was going to be discharged from the facility that had been her "home" for the past two years.

 

To make matters worse, the notice indicated that the facility planned to discharge the resident to her granddaughter's home 30 days later (the law requires 30 days notice).  My client had informed the facility that she could not take care of her grandmother and, furthermore, that the setup and amount of stairs in her three-level condominium was an unsafe environment.  Her grandmother would require two people to assist her with transfers in and out of bed or up and down the stairs to the bathroom.  The facility knew that a discharge to my client's home would not be safe.  They knew that my client worked two jobs to make ends meet.  They knew that she did nothing wrong in this process, and that they had actually failed to inform my client that they were filing a conversion from community MassHealth to long-term care MassHealth on her grandmother's behalf, so she should either pay an estimated PPA from that point on or hold the funds pending the approval.  While they are not solely to blame either, they are more responsible for the situation than my client, yet they issued this notice to try to bully my client to find a way to pay the outstanding balance.  I find this tactic to be nothing short of elder abuse!

 

The time, energy, and expense the facility expended to pursue a wrongful discharge of this resident would have been better spent developing a better system to ensure that this problem does not happen again with another resident.  I am not un-sympathetic to these facilities.  I know that they suffer as a result of the delays and abuses in the MassHealth system.  So do my clients. But, I suggest that we would all fare better if we communicated in a collaborative manner to address these recurring issues, rather than defensively on a case by case basis.

 

Tags: long-term care, elder law, duress, Elder Financial Abuse, family, nursing home, rights, admission agreement, Medicaid, exploitation

This Black Friday, purchase an Estate Plan instead ...

Posted by Judith Flynn on Fri, Nov 22, 2013 @ 14:11 PM

I have seen it reported that consumers spent $59.1 BILLION last year on Black Friday.  $59.1 BILLION! 

This number is staggering to me, and even more so when I consider the significant portion of these sales that likely represents well-intentioned, but useless, gifts.  So many items will be returned because they are the wrong size, the wrong style, or just not something the recipient wants or needs.

 

Even worse, how many of you have received something that you would never wear or use, but you did not return it because you did not want to hurt the giver's feelings?  Perhaps you re-gifted the item the next year, but let's face it - there is a great deal of waste around the holidays, and the true meaning behind the gifting has been stampeded in a rush to get the best prices.

 

What concerns me even more is that many people take out loans or make these purchases on credit cards, digging themselves deeper into debt in the process.  This is not what the holidays are supposed to be about.  Thanksgiving is a perfect time to reflect as a family, and to take steps to put the meaning back in the holidays.

 

You may want to consider setting a dollar limit, or having a grab to reduce the number of gifts each person needs to buy.  You might consider implementing a new charitable tradition that the entire family can feel good about, such as making or purchasing items for nursing home residents who may not have family of their own, or for homeless families.  You could conduct a food drive to replenish the food pantries that are always in need, or send items to our troops who are in harm's way to protect our country.  The possibilities are endless, and these gifts are always the perfect fit.

 

Let me offer another suggestion.  Before you and your family spend hundreds of dollars on things you probably don't need, consider putting the money towards something you should all have in place.  If every member of your family age 18 and older does not have a basic estate plan in place, consider spending on that instead.  At the very least, you should each have a Durable Power of Attorney and a Health Care Proxy with a HIPAA Release, appointing one or more agents to make health and financial decisions for you if you become unable to do so.

 

You can get additional information on my website about estate planning, long-term care planning, and other services. 

 

www.TheLegalCheckUp.com 

 

Whether you will be part of the Black Friday stampede or collecting items for others, I wish you all a wonderful Thanksgiving!

Tags: long-term care, asset protection, elder law, Legal Check Up, Legal Documents, Durable Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Health Care Proxy, Last Will & Testament, disability planning, Community Care, family, loved ones, Estate Planning, long-term care planning

SO TELL ME, WHAT IS YOUR SIGN?

Posted by Judith Flynn on Sun, Oct 07, 2012 @ 21:10 PM

     Yesterday was such a crisp fall day - a perfect day for a long bike ride.  I set off from my Hingham home, and made my way through Cohasset, Scituate, and Hull.  This course is my favorite as it combines some of the most breathtaking views with the challenges of the road (both the traffic and the hills!).  The ocean views along Jerusalem Road, Cohasset Harbor, and Gunrock Beach always make me forget how hard I'm working.

     The hues of the changing leaves along the way were not yet at peak, but breathtaking nonetheless.  There is one large field along the road from Scituate to Cohasset where I had to stop to take in the beauty of a doe and her two fawns.  They were probably only 20 feet away from the street, which was quite exciting to me as the only other times I have seen deer up close is when they have darted in front of my car!  The fawns were too busy eating to notice, but the doe never took her eyes off me.  She was beautiful and magestic, but she stared me down as if to let me know that those were her "children" and I had better not try to harm them.  The doe was like any other mother - guiding and protecting her young.

     A little farther into my ride I came to a series of long and challenging hills.  Just as I was huffing and puffing and pedaling as hard as I could, I felt someone's hand touch the right side of my back.  I was startled and quickly turned my head around to see who it was.

     There was nobody there.  But, how could that be?  The pressure of the hand on my back was unmistakable...  My mind raced as I tried to explain this to myself.  Could it have been a falling leaf?  A branch?  Did I imagine it? 

     No.  A couple of miles and much self-debate later, I knew in my heart that it was a sign; it was my mother.  Now, you may or may not believe in signs from those who have passed before us, but I am a firm believer.  This is, after all, not the first time that I have had a sign from my parents.  This is, however, definitely the most distinct.  The feeling of that hand on my shoulder, helping me over the hill, was just too distinct to ignore.  Even though my mother has passed, I know that she is still with me, guiding and protecting me like the doe with her fawns.

     So tell me, what is your sign?  Have you had such an experience with a sign from a loved one who has passed?  Please share your experience!

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Tags: Legal Check Up, family, parents, loved ones, priorities

THE LEGAL CHECK UP BOOT CAMP (c) - FALL WORKSHOP COMING SOON!

Posted by Judith Flynn on Tue, Sep 18, 2012 @ 22:09 PM

Note:  Rockland and Mansfield Boot Camps are fully booked!  We are maintaining a wait list and an additional date will be added when filled. 

IT'S BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND AND SURE TO "SELL OUT" QUICKLY ... 

THE LEGAL CHECK UP BOOT CAMP (c)

Families come in all shapes and sizes. Whether you are young, a boomer or a senior, single, married (traditional or same-sex), divorced, have children or not, have a family member with special needs, want to leave your estate to your pets ... whatever your situation, you need a comprehensive assessment and and an Estate Plan that is just right for you. Depending on your goals and your situation, your plan might focus on probate avoidance, tax minimization, asset protection, or special needs planning.

"I don't have enough to worry about" you say?

Well, be aware that whether you are wealthy, barely getting by, or somewhere in the middle -- there are basic documents you need to have in place in the event you become temporarily or permanently unable to act for yourself due to a physical or mental incapacity.

You can't afford not to have these basic documents in place in the event of an emergency.  If you don't have basic disability documents that appoint an agent to act on your behalf in such cases, your loved ones would need to petition the probate court for a guardianship and/or conservatorship to obtain the authority to act on your behalf.  These court processes can cost thousands of dollars.

So, delay no more.    

Come and learn how to protect yourself, your family, and your assets in the event of disability or death.

Not just another boring seminar ... in this free, comprehensive workshop you will learn every thing you need to know about Estate and Long-Term Care Planning.  Part of the workshop will be interactive to allow attendees to discuss particular problems, concerns and situations.

This workshop will cover:

* what estate planning documents you need in the event of disability;

* what estate planning documents you need in order to achieve your goals and objectives;

* how to properly select Agents, Personal Representatives, and Trustees;

* whether you need a Will, a Trust, or both;

* long-term care costs and payment options (Medicare, VA benefits, Long-Term Care Insurance, Private Pay and Medicaid);

* how to protect your home and other assets;

* how to provide for your child with special needs in a way that improves his or her quality of life without disrupting eligibility for public benefits;

Each attendee will receive a workbook and will "graduate" from the Boot Camp with a detailed, comprehensive plan of action.

The Fall workshops will be offered during the day (from 12-3 pm) and in the evening (from 5-8 pm).  Seating is limited to 12 in each session in order to provide individualized guidance to each attendee.  Session dates will be posted soon, but preference will be given to those who pre-register at:

http://www.thelegalcheckup.com/legal-check-up-boot-camp-registration/

 

Tags: PACE, home care, long-term care, asset protection, elder law, Legal Check Up, Legal Documents, Durable Power of Attorney, Estate Planning, Living Wills, Health Care Proxy, Last Will & Testament, disability planning, Medicare, improvement standard, Community Care, Elder Financial Abuse, undue influence, family, loved ones, nursing home, rights, Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PAC, Medicaid, Veterans Benefits, Medicaid Home Care, Estate Planning, long-term care planning

The TRUTH about ASSET PROTECTION

Posted by Judith Flynn on Wed, Mar 28, 2012 @ 08:03 AM

Most seniors I speak with feel that they have worked hard their entire lives, and that they should not have to spend all of their hard-earned assets on nursing home care.  They would like to pass some assets on to their children or grandchildren.

The problem with this, however, is that without proper guidance and advocacy, many seniors are often rushed into an Asset Protection plan that “protects the assets from the nursing home" and "protecs the assets for their children or grandchildren" ... and leaves the senior unprotected and vulnerable.  They fall victim to the many misleading ads in print on the radio that make false claims about asset protection, use scare tactics that are simply unconscionable, or offer deep discounts to sign up "today only."  No attorney worth dealing with is going to use any of these tactics to get your business.  Let me explain.

There are THREE FUNDAMENTAL RULES that you must understand about ASSET PROTECTION ...

1) You have not “protected” an asset until you have given it away, either to a person or a trust, with no legal right to change your mind and take the gift back in the future.

2) There is a five-year lookback period, which means that MassHealth can look at all of your financial statements going back five years, and they will impose a penalty for any gifts you made during that five years.  So, the assets are not fully protected until FIVE YEARS after you give them away.

3)  You could unintentionally be forced to a nursing home if you run out of funds to pay for continued care in your home.  If you “protect” assets by giving them away and getting through the five-year lookback period as outlined above, you will have no legal right to get the assets back and you may be left "unprotected" and unable to pay for the care you need to remain in your home.  

Certainly it is not any senior's intent to end up having to move to a nursing home because they "protected" their assets years earlier ... but it happens.  Part of the problem, in my opinion, is the prevalence of misleading ads that serve to scare and confuse seniors.

BEWARE of legal ads that encourage you to “Protect your Assets” while leading you to believe you are protecting yourself in the process … this is one example of an ad that I find to be very misleading, if not absolutely FALSE.

Learn about Asset Protection Trusts that:

      1) allow you to control your assets until death;

      2) allow you to retain all income from your assets

      3) enable you to protect your assets from the nursing home

     4) ensure you qualify for Medicaid in the shortest period of time

Let’s look back at the Fundamental Rules of Asset Protection.

Number 1 is FALSE because, while you may serve as trustee of the asset protection trust, it is not YOUR assets that you are controlling ... you gave the assets to someone else in order to "protect" them!

Number 2 is FALSE because, while you can retain the right to the income generated by the assets in an asset protection trust, the assets in the trust are no longer YOUR assets!  You gave the assets to someone else in order to "protect" them!

Number 3 is TRUE and FALSE - True because after five years the assets will be protected from the cost of your nursing home care, but FALSE because, once again, they are not YOUR assets any more -- you gave them to someone else in order to "protect" them.

Number 4 is FALSE because there is a 5 year lookback.  Assets transferred to an asset protection trust will not be fully protected until 5 years after they are transferred to the trust, and there is no attorney who can make you eligible with this strategy in less than 5 years.  In fact, there may be ways to make you eligible sooner based on your specific situation, but not with an asset protection trust.

Some asset protection strategies may be appropriate for you, but only if you can ensure your own future security in the process.  This is why a comprehensive assessment of your specific family situation, health and care needs, income and assets, and goals is critical to a successful Long-Term Care Plan.  A Legal Check Up will enable you to fully understand the risks and benefits and pros and cons of asset protection strategies, and will enable you to make an informed decision based on your specific situation.  

Remember, if a radio or print ad seems too good to be true, it probably is. And, if an attorney offers a discount on the cost of an asset protection plan, but the price is good "today only ..."  RUN, don't walk, to another elder law attorney.  These pressure and scare tactics are not appropriate and, frankly, offensive to most elder law attorneys. Your future security must be treated with the importance and thoughtful deliberation it deserves, by you and your attorney.

Call us today at 781-681-6638 to schedule a Legal Check Up or to get a schedule of upcoming seminars, or get more information at www.thelegalcheckup.com.


Tags: PACE, home care, long-term care, asset protection, elder law, Legal Check Up, Legal Documents, Estate Planning, disability planning, Medicare, Community Care, Elder Financial Abuse, family, loved ones, priorities, Medicaid, Medicaid Home Care

THE LEGAL CHECK UP BOOT CAMP (C)

Posted by Judith Flynn on Sun, Jan 15, 2012 @ 15:01 PM

I've heard many excuses for putting off long-term care planning, including:

Because ...

"I'm never going to a nursing home."

"I have Medicare."

"I have my child's name on all of my accounts, so the state won't count those funds"

"I'm a veteran, so the VA will take care of all of my long-term care needs."

"My kids will take care of me."

"I don't have enough assets to worry about."

"I put my daughter's name on all of my accounts and she will divide everything equally among all my kids when I die."

"I have my assets in a revocable trust, so they are protected."

"I am leaving everything to my son so he can take care of my child with special needs."

"I don't want to hurt any body's feelings so I just won't do any thing."

"I'll do it LATER."

You've probably used a few that aren't on this list too.  But, guess what?  LATER has come. LATER is TODAY. 

The Elder Law Office of Judith M. Flynn has developed a new workshop to help seniors get their affairs in order.  The Legal Check Up Boot Camp (c) is a free, comprehensive workshop to give seniors all the knowledge they need about Estate and Long-Term Care Planning.

This workshop will empower the attendees to stop procrastinating and finally take control of the decisions they have been avoiding for too long.

This four-hour workshop will be taught in two sessions of two hours each.  Part of the workshop will be interactive to allow attendees to discuss particular problems, concerns and situations.

This workshop will cover:

*what estate planning documents you need in order to achieve your goals and objectives;

* how to properly select Agents, Executors, and Trustees;

* whether you need a Will, a Trust, or both;

* long-term care costs and payment options (Medicare, VA benefits, Long-Term Care Insurance, Private Pay and Medicaid)

* how to protect your home and other assets; 

Each attendee will receive a workbook and will "graduate" from the Boot Camp with a detailed, comprehensive plan of action.

For more details about the Boot Camp or to register, go to:

http://www.thelegalcheckup.com/seminars-and-workshops/

 



Tags: PACE, home care, long-term care, asset protection, elder law, Legal Check Up, Legal Documents, Durable Power of Attorney, Estate Planning, Living Wills, Health Care Proxy, Last Will & Testament, disability planning, Medicare, skilled services, Community Care, family, nursing home, rights, Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PAC, Medicaid, Veterans Benefits, Medicaid Home Care, Personal Care Assistance Program

PEACE of MIND Gift Certificates are the perfect stocking stuffers!!

Posted by Judith Flynn on Mon, Dec 19, 2011 @ 18:12 PM

The holidays are a perfect time to give the gift of Peace of Mind.  PEACE of MIND gift certificates provide you with an easy way to initiate a positive conversation about estate and long-term care planning, and encourage your loved ones to get their affairs in order.

Your loved ones will not be offended by this thoughtful gift that still leaves them in control.  Best of all, it will not need to be returned because it  is the wrong size or color (although it can be returned if they choose not to use it, of course).

Exclusively from the Elder Law Office of Judith M. Flynn, PEACE of MIND Gift Certificates may be purchased in any dollar amount, or for specific services such as:  

* a Legal Check Up;

* Estate Planning Package (including Probate Avoidance and Tax Minimization);

* Asset Protection Package

* Special Needs Planning Package;

* College Student Health Care Proxy/Durable Power of Attorney Package.

Contact us today to learn more at http://www.thelegalcheckup.com/contact-us/

Tags: long-term care, asset protection, elder law, Legal Check Up, Legal Documents, Durable Power of Attorney, Estate Planning, Living Wills, Health Care Proxy, Last Will & Testament, disability planning, Medicare, family, nursing home, Medicaid, Medicaid Home Care

Give thanks for your health and security, and take steps to protect it for the future.

Posted by Judith Flynn on Fri, Nov 18, 2011 @ 14:11 PM

I've been feeling compelled to once again urge folks to update their basic estate planning documents and take steps to protect themselves and their hard-earned assets because I have seen a significant increase in crisis cases over the past few months.  One panicked daughter could not find out if her mother had been admitted to a psychiatric hospital as she suspected because mom’s Health Care Proxy did not have HIPAA (the health privacy law) release language in it.  The hospital would not speak with the daughter even though she was the named Health Care Agent because the Health Care Proxy is only effective when the principal is deemed incapacitated by a doctor. 

Then I received a call from Margaret to schedule an appointment for her mom (Betty), as her dad (Joe) was hospitalized and would need nursing home care when discharged.  After my meeting with Margaret and Betty, I knew I had to focus on this topic once again.  You see, this family represents the typical readers and, in fact, the typical clients.  Margaret has two siblings, and all of the children have been urging Betty to see an attorney.  They had actually cut my ad out of the SSSN a year ago for mom, who carried it in a folder with some other important information.  Whether Betty was in denial of her husband’s decline, too overwhelmed to deal with the issues, or just resigned that it was too late to do any thing to protect the estate, she didn’t make the call.  Margaret and her siblings did not want to overstep their boundaries and respected Mom’s independence.

So, there we were, faced with crisis planning to ensure that Joe receives quality care while preserving as much of the estate as possible for Betty’s security. There are more options available with advance planning, for sure, but we could still protect most of the estate with crisis strategies. Joe and Betty own four pieces of real estate and have other assets valued at approximately $519,000. Joe may not have more than $2,000 in his name and Betty is only allowed to retain about $109,000. The primary residence is non-countable by MassHealth in this case. Therefore, our plan needed to address the three additional properties and other “excess assets” of about $410,000.  We could protect two of the properties by utilizing exemptions in the MassHealth regulations to convey them out of Joe and Betty’s names.  One property would need to be sold, and we could take all of the excess assets (including the proceeds of the sale of the fourth property) and purchase an annuity that will pay a significant monthly income to Betty.  By converting the countable excess assets to an income stream for the community spouse, we could protect the estate.  Not bad for a crisis plan, right?  Not so fast … while we were able to develop a fantastic plan to protect nearly the entire estate, we can’t implement it!!  Not yet at least.

In order to implement this fantastic plan, we need Joe to sign the Deeds to convey all of the properties out of his name and to transfer all other assets to Betty.  If Joe had executed a comprehensive Durable Power of Attorney that provided Betty with the authority to sign such documents on Joe’s behalf, we could implement the plan using the DPOA.  But he didn’t.  As I tried to explain the problem to Betty and Margaret, Betty reassuringly said, “But he can still sign his name…”  I wish it was that easy, but it is not.  Due to Joe’s dementia, he would not understand what he was signing and I could not, therefore, notarize his signature on the Deeds.  While this plan could have been implemented within a week or two with a proper DPOA, we were instead required to seek the authority of the Court.  We filed a Petition asking the Court to appoint Betty and Margaret as co-guardians of Joe.  Since a guardian (even if it is the spouse) may not convey property of the Ward without Court approval, we must also file a Petition for Authority to Establish an Estate Plan, along with a number of emergency motions to try to get the approval as quickly as possible.  Betty must pay privately for Joe’s nursing home care until we obtain the Court’s approval to do the transfers under the guardianship and obtain MassHealth eligibility.  

I am reminded on a daily basis that the message of the importance of advance planning warrants repeating – over and over and over again.  Don’t be caught carrying an ad a year from now – take steps today to protect yourself.  Update your documents while you can still (knowingly) sign your name! Schedule a Legal Check Up to get started at http://www.thelegalcheckup.com/contact-us/

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Tags: long-term care, asset protection, elder law, Legal Check Up, Legal Documents, Durable Power of Attorney, Estate Planning, Health Care Proxy, Last Will & Testament, lack of capacity, disability planning, family

RED CARPET PREMIERE of guardianship training video ...

Posted by Judith Flynn on Tue, Nov 01, 2011 @ 17:11 PM

Sign up now for the annual dinner meeting of the Massachusetts Guardianship Association (MGA), featuring the “RED CARPET PREMIERE” of the new training video for family guardians and conservators.

December 6, 2011 at 5 pm

Newbridge on the Charles

6000 Great Meadow Road

Dedham, MA  02026

The video was produced by Northnode, Inc. in collaboration with the MGA and the Office of the Chief Justice of the Probate Court, Paula M. Carey.  The video, "Stepping In When Help Is Needed," was made possible through funds provided by the MGA and a generous grant from the Office of the Attorney General, Martha Coakley.  If you are a family guardian or conservator or a professional who deals with people who need guardians or serve as guardians, we welcome you to this premiere. Spread the word - all are welcome, but RSVP is required as outlined below.

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Seating is limited -- registration is required no later than November 28th:  call the MGA at 617-350-6500 or e-mail jflynn@thelegalcheckup.com. 

 

Tags: elder law, Legal Check Up, Durable Power of Attorney, Estate Planning, Health Care Proxy, Last Will & Testament, disability planning, Community Care, family, parents, loved ones